the-physics-obsession:

Love this man.

(Source: bogleech)

Day 11 of the 28 Monsters challenge: “A candy-based monster”.
———————————
This monster hops from town to town, seeking small children without adults near them. After spotting a potential victim, it’ll hide its main body inside its jar and shake itself a bit, making a strange rattling noise in order to attract the attention of the kid. When one apporaches and tries to open the jar, the creature quickly unfurls itself and “bites” the child before quickly hopping away, cackling maniacally.
The bites don’t really puncture skin or cause any harm at all. It seems this monster just likes to scare children.
———————————
Mint canes, cookies and candy corn! The blue clay jar is also part of the monster, like a shell.
What does candy corn even taste like? I don’t think I ever had any. Maybe I’ll find out this Halloween.

Day 11 of the 28 Monsters challenge: “A candy-based monster”.

———————————

This monster hops from town to town, seeking small children without adults near them. After spotting a potential victim, it’ll hide its main body inside its jar and shake itself a bit, making a strange rattling noise in order to attract the attention of the kid. When one apporaches and tries to open the jar, the creature quickly unfurls itself and “bites” the child before quickly hopping away, cackling maniacally.

The bites don’t really puncture skin or cause any harm at all. It seems this monster just likes to scare children.

———————————

Mint canes, cookies and candy corn! The blue clay jar is also part of the monster, like a shell.

What does candy corn even taste like? I don’t think I ever had any. Maybe I’ll find out this Halloween.

solaceames:

binghsien:

note-a-bear:

kaalashnikov:

cracked:

Dark Ages, Schmark Ages. The De-Textbook cuts through that and so much more fake-fact bullshit.

cloudy with a chance of witch burning

your periodic reminder that a good chunk of Europe basically shat the bed for a few centuries while everyone else kinda did their thing.

I am sorry I’m going to be that person.
This map is extremely inaccurate.
1) China was not going through business as usual China was going through the TANG DYNASTY i.e. the Golden Age of Chinese culture, which would lay down legal and social and poetic norms for the rest of Chinese history. The Tang is so influential that a lot of languages call Chinese people 唐人 (People from Tang.) (We call Chinese people “people from Qin” so.)
2) Japan is _first becoming literate_ during this time period (due to the influence of the Tang they adopt Chinese script), which is a BFD for poetry, religion, politics, society. Japanese court culture develops, which near the end of this period (11th century, around the time Europe enters “high middle ages”) will produce The Tale of Genji (by a totally awesome woman named Murasaki),widely regarded as the world’s first novel because of it’s deft use of irony and social commentary.
3) The southern part of Korea is experiencing the emergence of Unified Silla, a state that will last the entire period and will see the importation of Chinese and Indian buddhism, the construction of the first Confucian college in Korea, and so on.
4) In Mesoamerica, the Mayans are inventing astronomy, writing (the third and final independent invention of writing in human history), and a whole crapload of other stuff. This is the triumph of their culture.
5) The Umayyads in Spain are a massive center of technology, learning, and (comparative) religious toleration.
6) The Eastern Roman Empire, which spans both the green and yellow portions of your map, isn’t doing too badly either, bouncing back after losing territory to the Caliphate.
7) The Polynesians are colonizing the ENTIRE PACIFIC using amazing advanced navigation technology not rivaled until the INVENTION OF GPS.
8) I am not equipped to talk about Sub-Saharan Africa in detail (cue rant about how we never learn about subsaharan africa in the western educational system) but you can bet there are some major, amazing developments going on there too. I’d be shocked if there weren’t.
9) HOLY SHIT INDIA.
10) OMG SOUTH EAST ASIA. SOUTH. EAST. ASIA.
11) THEY WEREN’T BURNING WITCHES IN EUROPE DURING THE MIGRATION PERIOD (dark ages). Witch burning took off in the EARLY MODERN PERIOD, nearly 1000 years after this. Europe was going through some tough shit, which would leave them backwards compared to the rest of the world for 1000 years, but also there were some amazing things happening there, at least have the decency to be like “angry dudes with swords stabbing people” not WITCH BURNINGS FFS.
12) And ABSOLUTELY Islamic Caliphate was a totally amazing flowering of intellectual, artistic, and spiritual culture, a mixing pot between a thousand cultures and languages, and totally amazing. Don’t in any way want to diminish that in any way.

I’ve always winced when seeing the original picture, so thank you binghsien for that excellent commentary!
To add:
8) Around 1000 AD was a major wave of Bantu migration, carrying a new technology of advanced ironwork throughout Africa:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/2chapter4.shtml

solaceames:

binghsien:

note-a-bear:

kaalashnikov:

cracked:

Dark Ages, Schmark Ages. The De-Textbook cuts through that and so much more fake-fact bullshit.

cloudy with a chance of witch burning

your periodic reminder that a good chunk of Europe basically shat the bed for a few centuries while everyone else kinda did their thing.

I am sorry I’m going to be that person.

This map is extremely inaccurate.

1) China was not going through business as usual China was going through the TANG DYNASTY i.e. the Golden Age of Chinese culture, which would lay down legal and social and poetic norms for the rest of Chinese history. The Tang is so influential that a lot of languages call Chinese people 唐人 (People from Tang.) (We call Chinese people “people from Qin” so.)

2) Japan is _first becoming literate_ during this time period (due to the influence of the Tang they adopt Chinese script), which is a BFD for poetry, religion, politics, society. Japanese court culture develops, which near the end of this period (11th century, around the time Europe enters “high middle ages”) will produce The Tale of Genji (by a totally awesome woman named Murasaki),widely regarded as the world’s first novel because of it’s deft use of irony and social commentary.

3) The southern part of Korea is experiencing the emergence of Unified Silla, a state that will last the entire period and will see the importation of Chinese and Indian buddhism, the construction of the first Confucian college in Korea, and so on.

4) In Mesoamerica, the Mayans are inventing astronomy, writing (the third and final independent invention of writing in human history), and a whole crapload of other stuff. This is the triumph of their culture.

5) The Umayyads in Spain are a massive center of technology, learning, and (comparative) religious toleration.

6) The Eastern Roman Empire, which spans both the green and yellow portions of your map, isn’t doing too badly either, bouncing back after losing territory to the Caliphate.

7) The Polynesians are colonizing the ENTIRE PACIFIC using amazing advanced navigation technology not rivaled until the INVENTION OF GPS.

8) I am not equipped to talk about Sub-Saharan Africa in detail (cue rant about how we never learn about subsaharan africa in the western educational system) but you can bet there are some major, amazing developments going on there too. I’d be shocked if there weren’t.

9) HOLY SHIT INDIA.

10) OMG SOUTH EAST ASIA. SOUTH. EAST. ASIA.

11) THEY WEREN’T BURNING WITCHES IN EUROPE DURING THE MIGRATION PERIOD (dark ages). Witch burning took off in the EARLY MODERN PERIOD, nearly 1000 years after this. Europe was going through some tough shit, which would leave them backwards compared to the rest of the world for 1000 years, but also there were some amazing things happening there, at least have the decency to be like “angry dudes with swords stabbing people” not WITCH BURNINGS FFS.

12) And ABSOLUTELY Islamic Caliphate was a totally amazing flowering of intellectual, artistic, and spiritual culture, a mixing pot between a thousand cultures and languages, and totally amazing. Don’t in any way want to diminish that in any way.

I’ve always winced when seeing the original picture, so thank you binghsien for that excellent commentary!

To add:

8) Around 1000 AD was a major wave of Bantu migration, carrying a new technology of advanced ironwork throughout Africa:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/2chapter4.shtml

(via m-azing)

earthstory:

Geologic Map Day
For the final weekday in ‪#‎earthscienceweek‬ ‪#‎esw2014‬ there is no better story to tell than that of William Smith and this map. Today is Geologic Map day and this is literally the world’s first geologic map.
A geologic map is an interesting concept. To make a map, we go around and figure out what types of rock show up at the surface. That information is then transferred to map format – showing which areas have specific rock types appearing at the surface. If you want to find a rock type somewhere in a country, you look at a geologic map and it can take you there. If you want to find where mineral deposits are found or surface mines should go, a geologic map takes you there.

The first geologic map was created based on fossils by a British Surveyor named William Smith. At the time, people across Europe were beginning to extract, sell, and sometimes classify fossils. While working on canal projects and in coalmines, William Smith realized that certain packages of fossils distinguished certain rocks.
If he found rocks with one set of fossils in one place, they could be matched across the country even if the rocks were slightly different (a shale instead of a siltstone, for example). 
William Smith went through a period of unemployment that allowed him time to travel the country, speaking to fossil hunters and learning the units. In 1815, he published this map of Great Britain, by far the largest area ever put on a geologic map at that time.
Unfortunately, William Smith’s work was soon plagiarized and he fell into poverty before one of his former employers brought him to work at a museum – which is today known as Rotunda – The William Smith Museum of Geology. He was the first recipient of the Wollaston medal – the highest medal given by the Geological Society of London.
This map has been immortalized with a book title: “The Map that Changed the World”.
-JBB
Image credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Smith_(geologist)#mediaviewer/File:Geological_map_Britain_William_Smith_1815.jpg
Read more:http://www.amazon.com/The-Map-That-Changed-World/dp/0061767905http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/smith.htmlhttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=8733http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/WilliamSmith/page2.php

earthstory:

Geologic Map Day

For the final weekday in ‪#‎earthscienceweek‬ ‪#‎esw2014‬ there is no better story to tell than that of William Smith and this map. Today is Geologic Map day and this is literally the world’s first geologic map.

A geologic map is an interesting concept. To make a map, we go around and figure out what types of rock show up at the surface. That information is then transferred to map format – showing which areas have specific rock types appearing at the surface. If you want to find a rock type somewhere in a country, you look at a geologic map and it can take you there. If you want to find where mineral deposits are found or surface mines should go, a geologic map takes you there.

The first geologic map was created based on fossils by a British Surveyor named William Smith. At the time, people across Europe were beginning to extract, sell, and sometimes classify fossils. While working on canal projects and in coalmines, William Smith realized that certain packages of fossils distinguished certain rocks.

If he found rocks with one set of fossils in one place, they could be matched across the country even if the rocks were slightly different (a shale instead of a siltstone, for example). 

William Smith went through a period of unemployment that allowed him time to travel the country, speaking to fossil hunters and learning the units. In 1815, he published this map of Great Britain, by far the largest area ever put on a geologic map at that time.

Unfortunately, William Smith’s work was soon plagiarized and he fell into poverty before one of his former employers brought him to work at a museum – which is today known as Rotunda – The William Smith Museum of Geology. He was the first recipient of the Wollaston medal – the highest medal given by the Geological Society of London.

This map has been immortalized with a book title: “The Map that Changed the World”.

-JBB

Image credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Smith_(geologist)#mediaviewer/File:Geological_map_Britain_William_Smith_1815.jpg

Read more:
http://www.amazon.com/The-Map-That-Changed-World/dp/0061767905
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/smith.html
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=8733
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/WilliamSmith/page2.php

Tags: geology

continueplease:

maosandchayhem:

So I drive by this house every day on my way to work and it is definitely the Skeleton War HQ

Photo Source: [x]

My city

(via inuryuvr)

bostonsocks:

cryingarabella:

breaking news


#when did the onion start posting real news stories

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.

Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.

Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.

How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?

Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.

  1. The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
  2. Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
  3. While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
  4. As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
  5. The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

(via xekstrin)

This is the first time I’ve sucessfully managed to create a low poly model, a UV map, a texture map, a normal map, an armature, and an animation.

I’m so fucking proud of this stupid chicken bobbing its head you guys wouldn’t believe 

Model:

My take on the Chicken Legs from Golden Axe.

boohaanigram:

stirfriedawesomesauce:

memewhore:

sizvideos:

Video

Grow a whole fucking cabbage in the time it takes to do that.

Without a Judeo-Christian moral code in its society, Japanese scientists decide to play god.

this is a food sample. food samples are handmade FAKE food created for advertisement photography and display - all those pictures of delicious hamburgers in mcdonald’s ads & menus aren’t actual hamburgers they are fake ass food samples.

He’s pouring hot wax into cold water to form the fake food. which is actually very cool because it takes mad skill. do 62,000 people actually believe you can pour some magical liquid into water and create cabbage. this is why americans are so fat we can’t even distinguish wax cabbage from actual vegetables.

(via rinforzando)